The Most Terrifying And Dangerous Roads From Around The World

Incredible | 3/24/20

It is a truth universally held by all that not all roads are created equal. Some roads offer smooth sailing for all kinds of vehicles, some provide slight humps and divet for drivers who don’t mind the thrill of a bumpy ride, and some roads are absolutely terrifyingly crazy. We’re not talking about potholes and speed bumps anymore. We’re talking about driving on the edge of a cliff crazy. Are you up for taking the ultimate road trip?

Keep reading to see some of the most dangerous roads, streets, and highways in the world.

Skippers Canyon Road In New Zealand

dangerousroads.org
dangerousroads.org

Skippers Canyon Road in New Zealand was carved out over 140 years ago, and it basically hasn’t changed since it was first created. No maintenance has been done to make this road any safe. Not even your drivers’ insurance would cover you if you run into trouble.

If you were driving along this road and you encountered another driver, you would have to reverse for up to two miles before you could even find a semi-safe passing point.

The Apache Trail In Arizona

Pinterest / @TripAdvisorUS
Pinterest / @TripAdvisorUS

The Apache Trail in Arizona is one of the most breathtakingly beautiful roads for motor vehicles in America. That beauty and splendor come at a price, though. Driving switchbacks through a literal mountain is enough to make even the most fearless daredevil a little bit uneasy.

The Apache Trail cuts through the Superstition Mountains. The drive requires extreme focus and an extremely slow pace if you don’t want to tumble down a very steep cliff.

Zojila Pass In India

Yawar Nazir/Getty Images
Yawar Nazir/Getty Images

Zoji La is a high mountain pass in the Himalayas. The Himalayan highway goes straight through this mountain path to connect Ladakh and Kashmir. The uneven road surface means it’s only really suitable for off-road vehicles. Some areas of this road are inches away from a nearly vertical cliff. During the winter months, wind, snow, and rain make the road even more of a challenge.

If you ever find yourself in this region of India, avoid this road at all costs!

The Pasubio Road In Italy

ITALYMagazine.com
ITALYMagazine.com

The ancient Pasubio Road in Italy almost got shut down by the Italian government because of how unsafe it is. Residents of the cities surrounding this road would regularly use it even those it posed several dangers. The government basically wanted to save the citizens from themselves. Even though it’s dangerous, the way is well-known for its incredible views, as well as the 52 hand-carved tunnels.

People were speeding along this road in their motorcycles, though, which definitely isn’t a good idea.

Fairy Meadows Road In Pakistan

dangerousroads.org
dangerousroads.org

Yes, that nearly vertical patch of dirt you’re looking at is actually a road. More specifically, it’s the Fairy Meadows Road in Pakistan. This road is only open during the summer months. because it gets even more dangerous if it gets wet. A six-mile stretch of the track is exceptionally hazardous. The path was built hundreds of years ago by villagers on Nanga Parbat Mountain.

It hasn’t been renovated or repaired since then, although it has been lightly maintained.

The Road To Sagada On The Halsema Highway In The Philippines

dangerousroads.org
dangerousroads.org

The Halsema Highway is also known as the Benguet–Mountain Province Road, the Baguio–Bontoc Road, and the Mountain Trail. The only way to get to the Road to Sagada is via the landslide-prone Halsema Highway. Sagada is one of the top tourist spots in the Philippines and the only way to get there is by driving along this road.

In March 2013, List25 included the highway at #9 in its 25 Most Dangerous Roads in the World list.

Cotopaxi Volcano Road In Ecuador

MARTIN BERNETTI/AFP/Getty Images
MARTIN BERNETTI/AFP/Getty Images

The 40-km long dirt track links the Pan American highway with the Cotopaxi Volcano Road. There are many vulnerable sections that are branching off the highway too. There’s a little bit of everything, from enormous potholes, slippery slopes, and all-around dangerous driving conditions.

To make matters even worse, this bumpy stretch of road is also prone to flash-flooding. Seriously, unless you’re a professional driver, don’t even try to navigate your way through.

Trans-Siberian Highway In Russia

dangerousroads.org
dangerousroads.org

The Trans-Siberian Highway in Russia highway is one of the longest highways in the world, and we’re including the Trans-Canada highway on that list. Unlike the Trans-Canada Highway, the Trans-Siberian Highway is actually super dangerous. Much of it is completely unpaved. The road crosses through forests, mountains, and more to get from Vladivostok to St. Petersburg,

It’s definitely not the road you want to be on if you’re looking for some calm, casual Sunday driving.

Dalton Highway In Alaska

dangerousroads.org
dangerousroads.org

This icy road was built in 1974 as a supply route for the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System. Driving down this route means you’ll need to pack plenty of supplies. There are only three towns on the 413-mile trek, one of which is named Deadhorse.

There are also large sections of the road have fallen into disrepair. Dalton Highway is so bad that it’s been featured on America’s Toughest Jobs and the BBC’s World’s Most Dangerous Roads.

Atlantic Road In Norway

Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images
Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

The twisting ribbon of nothing but concrete might look beautiful, but don’t be fooled because driving along the Atlantic Road will feel like a roller coaster ride. It’s even worse when the weather isn’t on your side.

In this part of the world, visibility can disappear in a matter of seconds, so you have to stay alert as you make your way down all the road’s many twists and turns.

Pan-American Highway

Birgit Ryningen/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images
Birgit Ryningen/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

It’s the longest motorable road and when you see just how far it stretches, you’ll see why. It extends from Alaska all the way down to the tip of South America, about 19,000 miles in total.

Now, can picture crossing two continents and traversing through jungles, mountains, and more? It sounds like it’s coming out of Need for Speed. The highway passes through several different climates and ecological types, from deserts to jungles. Some areas aren’t even fully passable except during the dry season,

Patiopoulo-Perdikaki Road In Greece

dangerousroads.org
dangerousroads.org

It’s not a fun drive. This is a mountain road with many dangerous dropoffs. With drops that appear to be hundreds, if not thousands of feet to the side, experienced drivers could be the only ones who should attempt this route.

Outside of that, it’s not recommended to go here. As Dangerous Roads reports, the road “is meandering, hard to predict, and you may just end up at the bottom of a mountainside.”

Karakoram Highway

Mian Khursheed/For The Washington Post via Getty Images
Mian Khursheed/For The Washington Post via Getty Images

The highway connects China and Pakistan 15,400 feet above sea level, making it the highest paved highway in the world. There are no barriers, and many drivers have been victims of altitude sickness or distracted by the gorgeous views. Because of its high elevation and how difficult it was to construct, it’s even referred to as the Eighth Wonder Of The World.

The good news? There are plans to widen the road from 32 feet to nearly 100.

Canning Stock Route In Australia

hermamaps.com
hermamaps.com

Australia is full of dangerous animals, and there are apparently some pretty dangerous roads in the Land Down Under as well. Yeah, this certainly doesn’t offer any excellent views. The 1,150-mile-long track is one of the world’s most remote roads. It’ll take you two to three weeks to drive it from start to finish.

It’s impossible to travel when it’s hot, and drivers are advised to travel in multi-vehicle convoys.

Taroko Gorge Road In Taiwan

Alberto Buzzola/LightRocket via Getty Images
Alberto Buzzola/LightRocket via Getty Images

The Taroko Gorge Road in Taiwan is the most dangerous road in the country. This hazardous path features blind bends and mountain drops. The Taroko Gorge is also prone to massive typhoons. Plus, seismic activity can happen at any time, adding yet another danger to this whole equation. The Taroko Gorge Road contributes to over 95,000 deaths in Taiwan every year.

Oh, also rockfalls are common in this gorge. It’s not a place you want to spend a lot of time in.

Khardung La

SKODA AUTO / We Love Cycling / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images
SKODA AUTO / We Love Cycling / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Speaking of rocks, rock slides are actually a huge concern at Khardung LA. Khardung La is a mountain pass in India that boasts an elevation of 17,359 feet at its highest point. It’s often incorrectly cited as the highest vehicle-accessible pass in the world. That fact isn’t exactly true, but that doesn’t mean that this place still isn’t very high and very dangerous.

If the threat of a rock slide pummeling your car isn’t your idea of a good time, maybe take another route.

Rodovia da Morte In Brazil

Giles Clarke/Getty Images
Giles Clarke/Getty Images

The Rodovia da Morte in Brazil literally has the word “death” in its name. You can’t get more terrifying than that. This road, which is also called the BR-116, is the second-longest highway in Brazil. Over a thousand people die on this road every single year. The cliff section that leads up to Sao Paulo is extremely dangerous.

Most of these deaths occur due to poor weather conditions and winding roads that run very close to the mountain’s edge.

Tizi-N-Test In Morocco

Independent Picture Service/UIG via Getty Images
Independent Picture Service/UIG via Getty Images

The narrow winding road was blasted out of the rock in the 1920s. The Tizi-N-Test became the first modern road link between Marrakech and Souss Plains. The steep drops mean it’s best to avoid if you suffer from vertigo. Local drivers are known to drive along the road at break-neck speeds, so you can probably guess who’s a local and who’s a tourist.

During the winter, landslides and avalanches occur almost on a daily basis.

Guoliang Tunnel In China

Feature China / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images
Feature China / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

The inside of this 3/4 mile road tunnel is only 16 feet tall, so it’s not recommended for people who have claustrophobia. It’s in the Taihang Mountains of Henan Province in China. It’s not recommended to stop and take a selfie with the carved out windows, but as you can see, that’s what this lady is doing.

Oh, and before it was built, locals from the village used a ladder to get back and forth.

North Yungas Highway In Bolivia

Giles Clarke/Getty Images
Giles Clarke/Getty Images

It went into La Paz, which holds the honor of the world’s highest capital city. Eventually, authorities built a shiny new highway, and locals continued to speed down the road.

One of the most unnerving sights is the dozens of makeshift memorials, which are dedicated to those who lost their lives. Atlas Obscura reports that “by some estimates, between 200 and 300 people die a year on the road.” We’ll take a pass on this one.

US Route 431 In Alabama

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Pinterest

There are many factors that contribute to this road’s nickname, “the Highway to Hell.” Some of these factors include poor visibility, speeding, and unexpected lane changes. The highway is filled with crosses to commemorate the many victims down the stretch.

US Route 31 was voted one of “America’s Deadliest Highways” by Reader’s Digest in 2000. We’ll take their word for it and steer clear of this stretch of highway, thank you very much.

Ruta Nacional 5 In Chile

dangerousroads.org
dangerousroads.org

The Atacama Desert is one of the driest in the world. The national highway Ruta 5 travels right through it as well. With strong winds, no petrol stations, all you can do is say hello to boredom and huge gusts of wind.

If that’s not enough, a dense fog can blind drivers, and the fog can appear in a matter of mere seconds. Don’t plunge off the side of the road

Eshima Ohashi Bridge In Japan

eshima ohasi bridge japan
Reddit/ImagesOfNetwork
Reddit/ImagesOfNetwork

Eshima Ohashi Bridge is the largest rigid-frame bridge in Japan and the third-largest in the world. It was built to help ships pass underneath it with ease. While that’s great news for the seaman, it means that drivers have to traverse a bridge with very steep angles.

The bridge may be short in length but experience serious elevation gain — and fast. If you’re afraid of heights, you’ve been warned!

Caucasus Road In Russia

TASSTASS via Getty Images
TASSTASS via Getty Images

Unpaved? Check. Narrow? Check. Difficult to navigate? Double check. To put it simply, Caucasus Road in Russia (also known as Route M29) is a hot mess that tests drivers’ ability to maintain their composure.

When you add rain or snow to the mix, things only get more challenging. In the winter months, the stretch is often closed due to the danger of avalanches. Oh, and did we mention part of the road dissects a mountain?

Le Passage du Gois In France

Maurice ROUGEMONT/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images
Maurice ROUGEMONT/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Le Passage du Gois in France is unique because it cuts through a body of water. While this makes for a scenic driver at times, it also means that high tide is a nightmare. In fact, drivers are advised to take caution even when the tide is low as rogue waves tend to splash over the side.

This treacherous road floods on a daily basis, and there have been numerous incidents of cars being completely submerged.

Road To Hana Boasts Ocean and Mountain Views

Sergi Reboredo/VW PICS/UIG via Getty Images
Sergi Reboredo/VW PICS/UIG via Getty Images

The Road to Hana is a must for travelers visiting the island of Maui. The Road to Hana is famous for its natural beauty, unblemished landscapes, and incredible waterfalls. While the majority of the road is paved, drivers should still be cautious of narrow pathways and steep cliffs.

Tripadvisor has this take on the Road to Hana: “nothing but sharp – blind turns, one way roads, one car bridges on roads that continuously turned and not wide enough for two cars..”

Stelvio Pass Road

DigitalGlobe/ScapeWare3d / Contributor
DigitalGlobe/ScapeWare3d / Contributor

Located in the Italian Alps, Stelvio Pass is considered to be the most-winding road in the world. With switchbacks aplenty, this road challenges even the most experienced drivers.

Complex says that this “15-mile stretch of road is riddled with 48 hairpin turns-some of which feature hair-raising 180-degree corners. One wrong move and you could find yourself going over the low concrete barrier and down the side of the Alps.” Yikes!

The Sichuan-Tibet Highway

Arterra/UIG via Getty Images
Arterra/UIG via Getty Images

The Sichuan-Tibet Highway is breathtaking and is also one of the most statistically dangerous roads in the world. In bad weather, this highway can be an absolute nightmare for inexperienced drivers.

Thanks to frequent avalanches, rock slides, and generally poor weather in the area, the highway is seriously prone to accidents. In fact, in the last two decades, there have been 82,000 accidents or 5.1 accidents per every 10,000 vehicles.

A44 In England

Antony Stone/PA Images via Getty Images
Antony Stone/PA Images via Getty Images

A44 runs from Oxford to Aberystwyth in the United Kingdom. Upon first glance, the road may seem like your normal thoroughfare, but don’t be fooled.

A44 changes what side of the road drivers are required to drive on, which is not only confusing, but potentially deadly — especially for unfamiliar drivers. Because there’s only one lane in each direction, it’s no surprise that this road experiences a significant number of head-on collisions.

A537 In The UK

Christopher Furlong / Staff
Christopher Furlong / Staff

A44 gets a bad rap, but there’s another United Kingdom highway with a dangerous record. A537 is a two-lane highway that looks pretty run-of-the-mill at a glance — but this highway has been the location of 34 critical accidents in recent years.

The highway is recognized by the United Kingdom’s Road Safety Foundation as being very dangerous. If that’s not enough for you to avoid it, its nickname is “The Widow Maker.”

Luxor-al-Hurghada Road

Pinterest / @LegendaryFinds
Pinterest / @LegendaryFinds

Luxor-al-Hurghada Road presents dangers in many forms. For starters, much of the road is devoid of pavement and the lack of streetlights makes driving at night especially perilous. But the biggest dangers of Luxor-al-Hurghada Road are the people that inhabit the area.

The area is known to have bandits camped throughout and most accidents are actually a result of criminal activity. Seeker reports that this “road is so dangerous that people who drive on it at night turn off their lights in hopes of escaping any potential bandit attacks.”

Patiopuolo-Perdikaki Road In Greece

YouTube / Ser Pappas
YouTube / Ser Pappas

Patiopuolo-Perdikaki Road in Greece is absolutely breathtaking, but don’t let its beauty fool you. Thanks to a combination of lack of maintenance and few guard rails, this road is one of the most dangerous in the world. There are dropoffs on either side of the road ranging from hundreds to thousands of feet deep.

Due to its high elevation, the area is susceptible to cold temperatures and inclement weather which only makes traversing the route all the more terrifying.

Transfăgărășan In Romania

Alexander Spatari / Contributor
Alexander Spatari / Contributor

Romania’s highest road draws drivers in with the promise of breathtaking views — but Transfăgărășan should only be traversed with extreme caution.

Climbing to an altitude of 6,699 feet, Transfăgărășan is dotted with sharp descents, long S-curves, and hairpin turns. Due to its topography, the average speed limit is just 25 miles per hour, but daredevils often push the limits. Those who dare to brave this road can expect endless twists and turns and a thrilling ride.

R504 Kolyma Highway

Wikimedia Commons / Missy Leone
Wikimedia Commons / Missy Leone

You don’t earn a nickname like “Road of Bones” for nothing. The R504 Kolyma Highway has a unique history. It was built by prisoners n 1932 and was finally completed two decades later. During that time, many of the prisoners died, so the road was named after their skeletons.

As if you needed another reason to avoid this route, here’s one more. The coldest temperature ever recorded outside Antarctica occurred here.

Commonwealth Avenue In The Philippines

Medium / talalsarwarkhanniazi
Medium / talalsarwarkhanniazi

Does the idea of driving without and law enforcement or regulations sound like a dream to you? If so, get on over to Commonwealth Avenue in the Philippines. While you may get to your destination faster by taking this route, it’s important to be vigilant.

The road in Quezon City has had numerous cyclist, pedestrian, and vehicular collisions throughout the years, many of which have been fatal. It’s not called “Killer Highway” for nothin’.

Pangi via Kishtwar Is Only Accessible for Part of the Year

YouTube / @HimalayanRoads
YouTube / @HimalayanRoads

The Pangi via Kishtwar boasts some of the most breathtaking views on the route, which passes through two remote districts, Jammu and Kashmir. For those who are brave enough to take the journey, the payoff is (potentially) huge as the valley of Pangi is hidden between the Zanskar and Pir Panjal ranges in the Western Himilayans. Few people see the wonder because it is often covered with snow.

While the sites of sure to be incredible, they come at a cost. This drive is particularly volatile and much of the journey takes place on one-lane dirt roads.

A726 In Scotland

Pinterest / vickrauser
Pinterest / vickrauser

A726 is located in Scotland and boasts miles of lush green scenery…but perhaps it’s too scenic? While the road may look picturesque, it’s known for being one of the most perilous.

A726 is the site of numerous fatal collisions, particularly head-on crashes and wrong-way drivers. In recent years there have been petitions to decrease the speed limit in the hopes of preventing future accidents. The A726 is also especially dangerous for pedestrians and bike riders because of its many twists and turns.

Arica To Iquique Road

Pinterest / @AndreaEskuche
Pinterest / @AndreaEskuche

There’s something about driving on a scenic road that makes us feel a false sense of security — but don’t let this road fool you. Arica to Iquique is a road that runs through an area of Chile. It’s undoubtedly beautiful, which may make drivers distracted or blissfully unaware that they’re speeding.

But with its steep drops, deep valleys, and long strips of desert, this road should be traversed with caution.

Karnali Highway

Pinterest / @YourDailyDish
Pinterest / @YourDailyDish

Nepal has some dangerous roads, but this one is considered the most dangerous in the country. Karnali Highway’s annual death toll is somewhere around 50. This is largely thanks to its unpaved roads and deep potholes coupled with steep climbs and numerous cliff sides.

The highway spans 144 miles and is a vital transport link between the regions of Jumla and Karnali in Nepal, which means some drivers have no choice but to traverse the highway and hope for the best.

Vitim River Bridge

Pinterest / @bethanycat123
Pinterest / @bethanycat123

People joke that Vitim River Bridge should be called the Victim River Bridge because of how dangerous it is. Jokes aside, this bridge has a bad reputation for how scary it appears, but luckily, there have been no fatalities.

This is likely because so few people dare to cross the bridge. The structure is old and barely wide enough for a small car. With no guardrails, most people just don’t want to take the risk.

The Old Bridge Of Konitsa

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Athanasios Gioumpasis/Getty Images
Athanasios Gioumpasis/Getty Images

Located in Eprius, Greece, the Bridge of Konitsa is the stone portal that leads to and from the ancient town of Konitsa. Built in 1870, it crosses where the Aoos river meets the Voidomatis river. Rich with history, the region was first inhabited way back in 2100 BC it looks as though ancient Greeks might have traversed the bridge at some point.

The narrow bridge is likely the largest single-arch bridge in the Balkans.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

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Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images
Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Located in Vancouver, British Columbia, the Capilano Suspension Bridge Park is one of the area’s most prominent attractions. Built in 1889, the bridge is 450 long and 230 high. Located right above the Capilano River, this scenic bridge is surrounded by the beautiful forests of Vancouver.

When “Mac” MacEachran purchased the bridge in 1935, he invited local natives to place totem poles in the park, which visitors can still view today.

Road Trip Across The Navajo Bridges

arizona-grand-canyon-national-park-colorado-river-rafting-under-the-original-navajo-bridge-over-marble-canyon.-55985
Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The Navajo Bridges are two two steel parallel-running bridges that cross the Colorado River in northern Arizona. Originally named the Grand Canyon Bridge, the bridges connect southern Utah to Arizona, making it a perfect route for a road trip or a beautiful walk, as it opened to pedestrians in 1995. It sits 476 feet above the Colorado River with a breathtaking view.

The Navajo Bridges are tied at ninth place among the highest bridges in the United States.

Pulau Langkawi Sky Bridge

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John S Lander/LightRocket via Getty Images
John S Lander/LightRocket via Getty Images

Completed in 2005, the Langkawi Sky Bridge is a pedestrian cable bridge that is 2,710 feet above sea level and stretches a curvy 450 feet. The bridge hangs over the peak of the Gunung Mat Chinchang on the main island of the Langkawi island cluster in Kedah, Malaysia. The views are incredible!

The stunning bridge was closed in July 2012 for maintenance and upgrading and finally had a partial reopening in February of 2015.

The Zhangjiajie Glass Bridge

the-worlds-highest-pedestrian-bridge-in-zhangjiajiechina.-30330
Costfoto / Barcroft Media / Barcroft Media via Getty Images
Costfoto / Barcroft Media / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

When it opened in 2016, the Zhangjiajie Glass Bridge was the longest and tallest glass-bottomed bridge in the world. Located in China, it measures 1,410 feet long, 20 feet wide, and is suspended an incredible 853 above the ground.

It’s a pedestrian-only bridge and is designed to hold up to 800 people at a time. But don’t look down while you’re crossing or you may get a serious case of vertigo.

The Ojuela Bridge

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Christian Frausto Bernal/Flickr
Christian Frausto Bernal/Flickr

Ojuela was a small mining town in Mexico that was eventually deserted for the most part. The original bridge was constructed in 1898 by the Roebling Brothers, who also designed the Brooklyn Bridge. A restoration project in 1991 established the bridge as a tourist attraction.

At one point, it was the third-longest suspension bridge in the world. It looks sketchy, but it’s not even close to being the scariest on this list.

Mackinac Bridge, Michigan

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Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

This bridge can be so frightening for people to cross that there’s a free 24/7 service called The Mackinac Bridge Authority’s Drivers Assistance Program which provides people with a driver!

The Mackinac Bridge connects Michigan’s Upper and Lower Peninsulas. The height and the wind, which often exceeds 30 mph. If you’re curious to see the bridge without actually crossing it yourself, there is a webcam online as well as weather and traffic updates.

Royal Gorge Bridge

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Instagram @chiehyunliao
Instagram @chiehyunliao

The Royal Gorge Bridge crosses the Arkansas River and connects to either side of the Royal Gorge in Canon City, Colorado. This bridge is super high. In fact, it was the world’s highest bridge from 1929 until 2001. It is still the highest bridge in the United States, suspended 955 feet above the river below.

After being rebuilt following a fire, the bridge had a grand reopening in May 2015 with new gondolas and a zip-line for its more adventurous visitors.

The Millau Viaduct Is One Of The Tallest

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Frank Renout/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images
Frank Renout/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images

The Millau Viaduct is in the gorge valley near Millau in the south of France. It’s 890 feet from the deck to the ground, making it the 22nd highest bridge in the world. But, if you were to measure it from the field to the top of the most upper mast (1,104 feet) it’s the tallest bridge

The Millau Viaduct won 2006 Outstanding Structure Award from the International Association for Bridge and Structural Engineering.

The Hureai Bridge Is In Its Own League

hureai-64407-53562
takosaka/Flickr
takosaka/Flickr

If you think that straight bridges are overrated, then you might be interested in visiting the Hureai Bridge in Nantan, Japan. This circular pedestrian bridge allows its crossers to get a sense of their surroundings by walking in a circle to get to the other side.

Completed in 2003, this unique pressed concrete bridge located at the foot of the Hiyoshi dam breaks the status quo about our perception of bridges.

Pont du Gard Aqueduct

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images
Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Although there may not look like there’s anything wrong with it, you might hesitate to cross after learning that it was built in 40 AD. Although Roman architecture has proven to be sound, a bridge that old seems questionable.

The beautiful Pont du Gard Aqueduct has been visited by tourists for centuries and is one of France’s top five tourist attractions. It was initially used as an aqueduct and as a way to cross the river.

Ireland’s Carrick-A-Rede Rope Bridge

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Instagram @ntcarrickarede
Instagram @ntcarrickarede

Eagle-eyed fans may recognize this bridge if they watched Game of Thrones, which was filmed there. The Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge in Northern Ireland connects the mainland to the island of Carrickarede, crossing the Atlantic Ocean.

Strangely enough, the bridge is thought to have been built by a salmon fisherman over 350 years ago. It’s suspended 100 feet above the ocean and you can only cross if the weather is being cooperative.

Trift Bridge

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Instagram @travalery_
Instagram @travalery_

If you dare, the Trift Bridge is located in the Switzerland Alps and suspends over the Trift Glacier. The pedestrian bridge is 328 feet high and 558 feet long, making it an excellent sightseeing location and place to get some amazing photos if you can compose yourself long enough to look around.

Visitors can reach the bridge two different ways. You can choose to take a cable car followed by a gondola ride, or you can hike to get there. Expect to spend about an hour and a half hiking uphill if you opt to go on foot!

The Longest Bridge Over Water: Jiaozhou Bay Bridge

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STR/AFP/Getty Images
STR/AFP/Getty Images

The Jiaozhou Bay Bridge is a roadway in China’s Shandong province. It’s one of the longest bridges over water, measuring in at just under 25 miles. The company that constructed the bridge claims that it has the world’s largest number of oversea bored concrete piles

If you don’t like being on bridges for an extended amount of time, you might want to avoid this one at all costs, even though it can save 20-30 minutes on your commute time.

Cherrapunji Root Bridge

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IndiaPictures/UIG via Getty Images
IndiaPictures/UIG via Getty Images

If you want to feel like you’re walking in a fantasy world, check out the root bridge in Meghalaya, India. The Nongriat village in Cherrapunji has spent generations directing the growth of these trees and roots to construct an entirely nature-made bridge.

Because of the climate, most wooden bridges would collapse, but the trees used in these amazing bridges have extremely powerful roots that can withstand the test of time.

Mount Titlis Bridge: The World’s Scariest Bridge

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FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images
FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

At around 10,000 feet above sea level, the Mount Titlis suspension bridge, known as the “Titlis Cliff Walk,” is 328 feet long and only 3 feet wide. Located in the Swiss Alps, it is considered to be the highest suspension bridge in Europe.

It opened in 2012, in the middle of a snowstorm nonetheless, and was described by the media as “the world’s scariest bridge.” Rest assured, however, that the bridge was designed to withstand winds that reach over 120 mph.

The Modi Khola Bridge Above Glacier Run-Off

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Frank Bienewald/LightRocket via Getty Images
Frank Bienewald/LightRocket via Getty Images

This old suspension bridge is in the Upper Modi Khola Valley in Nepal. The bridge crosses a small river that is glacier run-off from the peaks of the Hiunchuli and Machapuchare peaks. They flow into the Madi Khola River and then throughout several channels.

Although the wooden bridge looks like it’s about to fall apart, the beauty of the scenery might be worth the risk! The many people who visit each year will attest to that.

Tea Park Bridge

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VCG/VCG via Getty Images
VCG/VCG via Getty Images

In Xuan’en’s County in China’s Hubei Province, visitors can get a bit of an adrenaline rush in a tea park, of all places. The tea park has the option to walk across the “air corridor” which is 3,200 feet long made up of wooden planks, tires, ropes, and more. It is one of the biggest and by far the most dangerous attraction at the park.

Hundreds of tourists are drawn to test their nerves on the bridge each year.

The Confederation Bridge

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DeAgostini/Getty Images
DeAgostini/Getty Images

The Confederation Bridge, formerly referred to as the “Fixed Link,” connects Prince Edward Island with New Brunswick, Canada. The construction of the two-lane bridge took four years between 1993 and 1997. The bridge is around 200 feet tall and approximately 8 miles long traveling above the ice-cold water below.

It takes about 12 minutes to cross the Confederation Bridge when driving at the speed limit, which is 50 mph in good weather conditions.